justices of the peace in England, 1558 to 1640
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justices of the peace in England, 1558 to 1640 a later Eirenarcha by John Howes Gleason

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Published by Clarendon Press in Oxford .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Justices of the peace -- Great Britain

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 2-3.

Statementby J.H. Gleason.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKD7309.G55 J8
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 4 plates, 285 p. :
Number of Pages285
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17362700M

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The justices of the peace in England, to a later Eirenarcha, by J. H. Gleason Clarendon P Oxford Australian/Harvard Citation. Gleason, John Howes. , The justices of the peace in England, to a later Eirenarcha, by J. H. Gleason Clarendon P Oxford. Wikipedia Citation. Somerset, Worcestershire and the North Riding of Yorkshire between and It is a piece of social history, since its principal aim is to study the status and the circumstances of the appointment (and the rôle of politics and religion) of a very considerable number of justices of the peace ('). The book also attempts to judge their Author: Van Caenegem, C Raoul. A justice of the peace (JP) is a judicial officer of a lower or puisne court, elected or appointed by means of a commission (letters patent) to keep the past centuries the term commissioner of the peace was often used with the same meaning. Depending on the jurisdiction, such justices dispense summary justice or merely deal with local administrative applications in . The justice of the peace is the most familiar example of the English mon-archy’s reliance on part-time, unpaid, nonprofessional officials for the administration of government on the county and local levels. A national state developed early in England. When the king of England ruled England, the king of France ruled Paris and its : James G. March.

Justices of the Peace were a key element of local government in Elizabethan England. They were a voluntary position, however, it was a great honour to serve as a justice of the peace. They were responsible for ensuring law and order were kept in the counties. They were supervised by the Lord Lieutenants. In England and Wales a magistrate is appointed on behalf of the crown, to keep the peace within a specific district. The duties of the modern-day justices of the peace, who preside in the magistrates’ courts of England and Wales, evolved from those first bestowed upon them under the Justice of the Peace Act of In essence, the justices continue to deal mostly with minor . The History of Justices of the Peace Page 1 of 5. Origin of the Office The part played by lay magistrates in the judicial system of England and Wales can be traced to the year Richard I in that year commissioned certain knights to preserve the peace in unruly areas. They were responsible to the King for ensuring that the law was upheld. Sixteenth-Century Justices of the Peace: the needy poor within a specified division of the county and to find a collector to gather for their relief. The Book of Orders, The Justices of the Peace in England, A Later Eirenarcha (Oxford: Clarendon Press, ), p.

Justices of the Peace / A History of the Justices of the Peace for the Counties of England [Osborne, Bertram] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Justices of the Peace / A History of the Justices of the Peace for the Counties of EnglandAuthor: Bertram Osborne. Justices Of The Peace History. Judicial officers appointed to keep the peace. Appointed from ordinary citizens, they dispense summary justice dealing with less-important cases of common law, and deal with local administrative applications (such as licensing laws). Definition of Justices of The Peace. Alternatively known as magistrates. Background. Maintaining the peace had long been a concern of society and part of the Common Law, but that aspect of the Common Law was enshrined into statute by the enactment of the Justices of the Peace Act The primary reason for the legislation was due to concerns about soldiers returning from the War in France, and the potential of them not reintegrating back into Citation: 34 Edw 3 c 1. The Justices of the Peace in England, – A Later Eirenarcha (Oxford, ) Gowing, Laura, ‘ Secret births and infanticide in seventeenth-century England ’, Cited by: