Columbia River Basalt Group in the Spokane quadrangle, Washington, Idaho, and Montana
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Columbia River Basalt Group in the Spokane quadrangle, Washington, Idaho, and Montana by Allan B. Griggs

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Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Washington (State),
  • Spokane region.

Subjects:

  • Basalt -- Washington (State) -- Spokane region.,
  • Geology -- Washington (State) -- Spokane region.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 37-39.

Statementby A. B. Griggs ; with a section on Petrography by D. A. Swanson.
SeriesGeological Survey bulletin ; 1413, Geological Survey bulletin ;, 1413.
ContributionsSwanson, Donald A. 1938- joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE75 .B9 no. 1413, QE462.B3 .B9 no. 1413
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 39 p. :
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5016424M
LC Control Number76608142

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Columbia River Basalt Group in the Spokane quadrangle, Washington, Idaho, and Montana (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Allan B Griggs; Donald A Swanson; Geological Survey. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick sequence of Miocene flood basalt that covered northern Oregon, eastern Washington, and western Idaho between 17 and 6 million years ago. It is an important regional aquifer system, and, in its folded and faulted flows, it records the late Cenozoic structural evolution of much of the Pacific Northwest. Feeder Dikes of the Yakima Basalt Subgroup, Columbia River Basalt Group, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, and their Bearing on a Petrogenetic Model By Thomas L. Wright, Margaret Mangan, and Donald A. Swanson Abstract Regional geologic mapping of the Yakima Basalt Sub­ group of the Columbia River Basalt Group provides for aCited by: The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest, smallest and one of the best-preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, covering over , km 2 of mainly eastern Oregon and Washington, western Idaho, and part of northern Nevada.. The thick, layered lava flows of the CRBG erupted as flood basalts, which originate as some of the most highly effusive eruptions in the world.

The Columbia River Flood Basalt Province forms a plateau of , square kilometers between the Cascade Range and the Rocky Mountains. In all, more than individual large (average volume cubic km!) lava flows cover parts of the states of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Last updated: Octo Created: Octo Format: Web Page: License: U.S. Government Work: created: over 6 years ago: id: a5cfed-ae THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASALT GROUP: The Columbia Basin of eastern Washington is plastered with deep layers of a fine grained black rock known as basalt. The basalt is lava that cooled and hardened after it flooded over the landscape. These astounding lava floods occurred on a scale unequalled anywhere else on the entire planet. West Plains Hydrogeologic Framework The main water source for the West Plains are aquifers found in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) formations, overlying sediments, and interbedded sediments. In some areas of the West Plains there are documented water level declines ranging from 15 to feet which has given rise to concerns about the.

This guidebook arose out of a series of field trips held in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest American Geophysical Union meeting held in Bend, Oregon, September The PNAGU meeting included special volcanology sessions planned by William I. Rose, Jr., Bruce A. Nolf, amd David A. Johnston. Publication of the guidebook volume was originally planned for early by the Oregon. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick sequence of Miocene flood basalt that covered northern Oregon, eastern Washington, and western Idaho between 17 and 6 million years ago (Location Map).It is an important regional aquifer system, and, in its folded and faulted flows, it records the late Cenozoic structural evolution of much of the Pacific Northwest. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) hosts a regional aquifer system in portions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho which is the primary, and in many cases the only, water supply for numerous communities, small water systems, individual homes, industry, and agriculture. In much of the semi-arid Columbia Plateau, portions of the CRBG aquiferFile Size: 4MB. Columbia River Basalts: Features of a Typical Flow. Features of a Typical Flow Typical joint features in the Roza Member of the Columbia River Flood Basalt based on the exposure at Banks Lake, Washington. From Self and others (). Perhaps the most characteristic feature of the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province is the similarity of individual lava flows.